Friday, 20 May 2016

Colour Concepts: 1 - Introduction

I seem to have been thinking a lot about colour, lately - what colour things are, and, almost as importantly, what colour things aren't. We have as human beings a lot of pre-conceived ideas as to what colour things are - ask a child, and they'll tell you water is blue, earth is brown, sand is yellow, etc - and a lot of these are actually quite startlingly wrong if you actually look at the thing in question. And a lot of those misconceptions we carry into adulthood.

So, with that in mind, it's past time we had another series on this blog, and so here's 'Colour Concepts', a series of ponderings on what colour things actually are.

As a free starter, which if you aren't a regular reader of this blog you can go catch up on, and if you are you should know already:

There's no such thing as a brown horse (well, actually, there is, but it's rarer than you think!). And white horses often aren't white

7 comments:

  1. Now Mike, this could be very interesting. Thank you.

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  2. This should prove to be very valuable. If I can ask for something, can you list specific paint colors? It would greatly help those of us that are color blind.

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    1. Having troubles distinguishing certain colours myself, I second that suggestion! Looking forward to the series.

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  3. Are there paint ranges that you find particularly useful? Do you mix your colors? Are you an oils or water based enthusiast?

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    1. I try not to mix colors. I use vallejo paints and craft store paints. All acrylic.

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  4. This sort of article is very handy to have easily accessible. Probably my favorite horse colour is what I used to call 'sorrel' but which I now find is your 'blood bay' - a red-brown with dark points.

    The hardest colours I find are chestnuts that have blond manes and tails. I've never been able to get that straw colour right. So I tend to go for bays and duns as more or less the easiest to paint, with the occasional roans and even more occasional greys.

    I have experimented with a watery colour mix over a white undercoat to achieve piebald and fleabitten grey effects. Not sure they have been all that satisfactory though. I think too, as far as horse colours are concerned, we should be prepared to fudge things a bit on account of the effects of scale.

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  5. Excellent! Thanks Mike, I shall read with interest

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